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Archive for the ‘Things I Finished’ Category

In Person: Story Hour

notes

A few weeks ago I was able to make good on a promise and participate in the second installment of the Design Museum of Portland’s Story Hour series. The premise is quite simple: a group of storytellers have a short period of time to tell a story around a specific prompt. There are a few constraints, though: the time period is very short, either four or eight minutes, and you get a single image as your background, no slides or other a/v trickery.

The theme was ‘invisible design’ and while a bunch of kind of pop-design podcast fodder (Can you see the arrow in the FedEx logo?) came to mind I felt the constraints and format leant themselves to a little bit of meta tomfoolery.

So the whole thing was series of stories inside a talk inside an elaborate setup.

The effect was better experienced in person, but I’ll try to set it up here for you before sharing the substance of the speech.

The entire story was delivered as if I were reading notes off a sheaf of papers, and there were several references at the onset to visual aids helping me work in this unusual style. As the series of stories around the theme build, I begin to spread outward to talk about how this elaborate level of conscientiousness around how things are set up can ultimately deliver experiences that leave a real impression on people.

The big reveal was at the very end, when I turn my “notes” around and show they’re actually blank. The effect I was hoping to impart on the audience was one of “oh, he wasn’t reading from notes, he must have memorized it, that’s another level of invisible design that he’s incorporated.” I think there were a few clucks of understanding; to be honest, my heart was racing so much at flubbing a few final lines that I wasn’t paying total attention to the audience. But the overall effect was not, as was my fear, totally lost.

Despite the thematic around magic and creativity, there was no magic involved (unless maybe someone thought I erased the notes on the paper or wrote them in invisible ink). It was sheer, brute memorization. The short format (four minutes) and my tendency to want to pack these sorts of talks with information made it crucial that I get everything down to the second, timing-wise.

Suffice to say I rehearsed the shit out of this, in a bunch of different ways. I have talked in public in front of audiences probably 40-50 times a year for the last four or five years and to have a totally scripted thing that has to be super tight on time is one of the more challenging things tasks I’ve set myself.1

recordings

First, I wrote the draft. That took about a week of side-time. Then I went through proofs and made 3-5 paper edits to make the master. Then, I recorded myself speaking a version to time (four minutes on the dot) based on the final refinements. Then, I would alternate between a few elements: table reads, out loud, from the script; sessions where I’d listen to the recording continuously (riding my bike to work, or waiting for lunch at a restaurant); sessions where I’d listen and simultaneously copy the material in longhand. And lastly were sessions where I’d recite the speech cold, with no prompts, then listen and compare with the original printed draft. I have at least 15 of those saved on my phone.

I’ve never been good at memorizing, and respect that skill a lot in friends who can. (I am forever envious of one friend, trained in the classics, who has an enormous mental library of poems and toasts and whatnot.) I need musical accompaniment to make anything stick. And about 98% of my cultural HD is full of jingles and nonsense anyway. But somehow I managed to get through this with only a few flubs.

Anyway, here it is. Not sure if I want to do something like this again anytime soon but I done did it. And it managed (I think?) to be entertaining to the audience, and not just esoteric wank.

Here’s the background image I used:

parish_storyhour.001 (1)

 

I

I opted for the four minutes partly as a disaster mitigating strategy.

I’m here to talk about creativity but it could all go terribly wrong

Because normally my presenting style is clicking through slides, rapidly.

I would stalk around the stage and gesticulate and use clever Keynote builds and other slideware to keep your attention.

So I decided, with all these constraints, to be sure of my words, to write it down. <emphasize paper>

Because I just have this one slide. And it’s barely legible.

Whoops.

First rule of presenting, make the font big.

Fail part one.

That’s not my only problem.

I’m a poseur.

I’m not a designer.

I’m a writer.

I only discovered what a drop shadow was a few years ago when I wondered why my printed-out screenshots were black on the bottom.

And maybe my own design, of this talk, is no longer invisible.

‘Oh, ‘ you’re thinking, ‘he’s going to talk about how editing is invisible design’.

Fail part three.

Fuck.

 

II

Well, writing _is_ invisible design, that’s true.

Writers and designers, we’re cousins.

We both use craft to build worlds.

Some of you who appreciate vintage advertising will remember the Think Small-era Volkswagen advertising.

The layout was classic, a photo, a headline, copy.

But the art director saw the copy, and it was just a huge mass at the bottom of the page. So he used his X-acto to thin it out.

When his partner came in, he asked him to re-write it into the windows he had cut, and the ad finally worked, and is now famous.

Jason Fried, from 37signals, once said, ‘before you redesign, rewrite.’

This is fundamentally the same idea.

But there’s one step beyond this invisibility, beyond the craft of writing and editing: making it magic.

 

III

For my money Emily Dickinson is the greatest American poet.

<What was that? Some Emerson partisan there in the back?>

Almost all Dickinson’s 1,800 poems were published after she died, and they’re all clean copies.

We don’t know anything about her process; her craft was fully invisible.

And so scholars, trying to understand her work, are puzzled by things like this. <point to screen>

This is one of Dickinson’s Master letters, surreal drafts written sometime between when she was 28 and 32.

They’re otherworldly, almost an alternate universe to her poems, written to a figure only known as Master.

We don’t know the identity of ‘Master’.

It is a mystery.

Is it a lover?

God?

The Devil? Was Emily Dickinson involved in some kinda bluesman-at-Crossroads-type deal?

True Detective stuff.

Because we all want to know what kind of shadowy power lurks at the heart of Dickinson’s art—worldly or otherworldly.

 

IV

To create something truly sublime, you have to include elements of magic, and conceal, and keep secrets—and reveal them, maybe—in addition to all the craft.

You’ve got to have some of that ol’ Razzle Dazzle—at least a little bit.

Joseph Conrad wrote something to this effect in an essay called “Fiction Is Human History”.

“All creative art is magic, is evocation of the unseen in forms persuasive, enlightening, familiar and surprising.”

In creating amazing work, you take the invisible and choose if, and how, it reappears.

And that’s the magic…

<reveal papers>

…that craft can make design invisible…

<reveal papers>

…but only creativity can choose how to reveal it…

<reveal papers>

…to set an audience on a course to their own creative truths.

<reveal papers>

 

  1. Yes, the famous “short speech” quote (“If I am to speak ten minutes, I need a week for preparation; if fifteen minutes, three days; if half an hour, two days; if an hour, I am ready now.”) whoever said it, was running through my head pretty regularly. []

Written by Nick

August 12th, 2015 at 7:01 pm

Catch up on the Cannestagious Podcast

We podcasted at Cannes for the second year running, all part of our #cannestagious push1, and Dan Southern and I had a lot of fun hosting. We typically would have a few Contagious folk and a few external folk join for each one, and discuss what went on that day at the festival.

The timing was a bit screwy—last year it was a ‘morning after’ timing, so we’d record the intro and outtro and get some juicy gossip in there, then play the segments recorded the preceding day.2 For those who might be interested in gear: we use a Blue Yeti mic attached to an iPad running Bossjock software to do all the cues, ducks, fades, etc. Typically afterward I’d clean everything up in Audacity and send it over to Soundcloud. The one and only DJ Tedward did some dynamite bumps and idents for us. Our audio booth? The world’s largest walk-in closet, in our villa, with duvets draped through the shelving to muffle echo.

I think we’re going to look into doing more with the podcast; key will be finding out how me in Portland and Dan in London can connect in a way that’s got some measure of audio fidelity. (The last phone-in interview, recorded off a conference call line, is crapola.) If you’ve got any idea, let me know.

Anyway, we had some fun interviews: Scott Galloway, Joanna MonteiroIain Tait, Nick Childs and Sir Martin Sorrell, and we had one kinda live-y podcast segment where we went cold calling with The Barbarian Group and Rood Studios.

Here’s the mighty podcast playlist in all its glory too.

  1. dig that amazing papercraft Cannes Lion! []
  2. The awards results are under embargo until like 9pm every night, so we can’t publish when we learn the results at the press conference in the morning. []

Written by Nick

July 2nd, 2015 at 12:01 pm

Agency: Rick Webb’s Manual

IMG_1927

When I had to report on every little coming and going in the agency world I learned real fast that Rick Webb was a great quote. He’s got a lucid brain that can make the complex pretty clear and cut through most any flavor of bullshit. Rick’s compiled the breadth of his experience at The Barbarian Group into Agency: Starting a Creative Firm in the Age of Digital Marketing, essentially Rick Explains It All.

It’s a must-read if you’re thinking of starting an ad agency, and it’s great information that might corroborate other prejudices or processes you’ve developed if you work with them already, either as a supplier or a freelancer. Give it to your colleagues—I know I’ve got a few destined for mine. And keep a highlighter handy.

The book is essentially a more buttoned-down version of the KLF’s “The Manual (How to Have a Number One the Easy Way)” and if you followed all the instructions inside and were halfway decent at making ads you could probably succeed. The only thing missing, and maybe this is because Rick is savvy enough to leave room for a follow-up, is answering the question Why.

Why would anyone want to start an agency in 2015, when it’s easier than ever to build a brand from scratch, or take a novel technology to the stratosphere with free money from VCs? Maybe I’ll ask him and let you know.

Written by Nick

February 1st, 2015 at 11:56 am

The Soderbergh List: 2014

Around 2011, inspired by Steven Soderbergh, I started keeping track of notable works I read or watched. Here’s my list from 2014. I left a lot off, because a lot wasn’t notable. I didn’t include magazines or longer web reads Suffice to say I enjoyed all the stuff on this list because I don’t finish things I don’t enjoy, unless I’m forced to give criticism of them (which I did rarely last year).

Can you tell I wrote a book from January to July, and moved across the country in September? (Hint: I had a lot of movies to catch up on to relax.)

All caps, bold: MOVIE
All caps: TV SERIES
Italics: Book
Quotation marks: “Play”
Italics, bold: Comic
*: Re-read

 

1/1, FARGO

1/4, BREAKING BAD (S1-6)

1/5, SAY ANYTHING, HANNA

1/8, BOYS FROM BRAZIL

1/9, The John McPhee Reader, John McPhee

1/11, ARCHER (S1, E1-3); PORTLANDIA (S2, E3-6)

1/17, SALINGER

1/30, Dreaming in Code, Scott Rosenberg

2/4, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know, Kevlin Henney

2/15, The Boy Kings, Katherine Losse

2/17, GAME OF THRONES (S1)

3/24, “Ice,” Thomas McGuane

3/24, “The School,” Donald Barthelme

3/24, “Game,” Donald Barthelme

3/26, WORLD WAR Z

3/28, THE COUNSELOR

3/28, THE END OF THE WORLD

 3/29, GAME OF THRONES (S2)

4/4, “Shakespeare’s Memory,” Jorge Luis Borges

4/20, FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF*

4/22, The Tyranny of Numbers: Why Counting Can’t Make Us Happy, David Boyle

5/1, LONE SURVIVOR

5/22, The Ballad of Dingus Magee, David Markson

5/26, GAME OF THRONES (S3)

5/27, Rude Kids: The Inside Story of Viz, Chris Donald

6/11, Sex Criminals, Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky

6/13, Foucault’s Pendulum, Umberto Eco

7/25, JODOROWSKY’S DUNE

7/29, TINY: A STORY ABOUT LIVING SMALL

7/31, CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER

8/5, The Wicked + The Divine

8/16, Infinite Jest, David Foster Wallace

8/23, CHARIOTS OF THE GODS

8/23, SONATINE

8/23, MY LEFT FOOT

8/24, THE GODFATHER

10/04, HER

10/04, JFK

10/10, SNOWPIERCER

10/10, THE LEGO MOVIE

10/10, BROKEN FLOWERS

10/26, EDGE OF TOMORROW

10/26, MONUMENTS MEN

10/26, LA GRANDE BELLEZZA

10/31, GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

10/31, DALLAS BUYERS CLUB

10/31, VEEP S3

10/31, DON JON

11/1, BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR

11/2, Trout Bum, John Gierach

11/5, Vanishing Point, David Markson

11/9, AKIRA*

11/18, X-MEN ORIGINS: WOLVERINE

11/18, Lee Kuan Yew: The Gran Master’s Insights on China, the United States and the World, Allison and Blackwill

11/19, X-MEN: FIRST CLASS

 11/24, Wool Omnibus, Hugh Howey

 11/25, The Third Policeman, Flann O’Brien

 11/28, HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE

 12/6 DIE HARD*

 12/12 LOST IN TRANSLATION*

12/12 ELF*

12/12 ANCHORMAN 2

12/26 IN A WORLD

 

Written by Nick

January 30th, 2015 at 10:47 am

Appearing in La Petit Mort: River Talk

rivertalk_petitmort

A few months ago my buddy Michael Ventura asked me to write an essay for his new publication, La Petit Mort. Just last week I got the glorious, big-ass newsprint edition and found my piece, “River Talk,” reproduced faithfully. The design looks great, the illustration I cooked up wound up translating well visually, and I’m really grateful to have been involved and appearing alongside articles ranging from an ethical look at slum tourism to a primer on how to eat clean while traveling. The essay’s mostly about fishing, so head over to Current Flow State to read the whole thing.

Written by Nick

January 20th, 2014 at 7:16 pm

Tetraethyl Lead and Pure Inquiry

I just finished a standout investigative piece that’s aged very well, Jamie Kitman’s look into leaded gasoline’s terrifying public health legacy, published by The Nation in 2000.

A few things struck me.

One is the continued prevalence of the cascading uncertainty rule, described here:

By relying on what Jerome Nriagu of the University of Michigan has called the cascading uncertainty rule (“There is always uncertainty to be found in a world of imperfect information”), the lead industry and makers and marketers of TEL gasoline additives were able to argue in 1925: “You say it’s dangerous. We say it’s not. Prove us wrong.” (Or, as Nriagu prefers, “Show me the data.”) They still do.

This is an almost classic misdirection that’s affecting how we judge huge dangers to society and public health, like vaccinations and global warming.

Meanwhile, a crusading scientist used techniques for determining this age of the earth to hypothesize how badly we were screwing it up by blanketing it with lead. Clair Patterson then gave what stands as a lasting caution against undue influence in research. This has recently been in the news, with Wall Street and academia cozying up.

“It is not just a mistake for public health agencies to cooperate and collaborate with industries in investigating and deciding whether public health is endangered,” Clair said. “It is a direct abrogation and violation of the duties and responsibilities of those public health organizations.”

I tend to use a lot of others’ research to make points; often, I can be lazy about sourcing. Was it the federal government, or a non-profit organization that’s providing that figure, or is it an entity motivated to make a specific commercial point? Research, both good and bad, can be easily manipulated. This served as a great reminder that concrete, civic-minded fact-finding is always going to serve the truth better than interested parties’ ‘findings’.

Written by Nick

January 16th, 2014 at 1:17 pm

2013 Media Consumption

Around 2011, inspired by Steven Soderbergh, I started keeping track of notable works I read or watched. Here’s my list from 2013. I left a lot off, because a lot wasn’t notable. I didn’t include magazines or longer short reads (ie short stories not part of a collection) because that’s turned out to be  too much notation for me. Suffice to say I enjoyed all the stuff on this list because I don’t finish things I don’t enjoy, unless I’m forced to give criticism of them (which I did rarely last year).

All caps, bold: MOVIE
All caps: TV SERIES
Italics: Book
Quotation marks: “Play”
*: Re-read

 

1/1, WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN

1/15, The Orphan Master’s Son, Adam Johnson

1/18, SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

1/19, FOREIGN INTRIGUE (1956)

1/20, TERMINATOR*

2/7, KLF: Chaos, Magic, Music, Money, JMR Higgs

2/9, JIRO DREAMS OF SUSHI (2011)

2/10, Wittgenstein’s Mistress, David Markson

2/11, Blank Spots on the Map, Trevor Paglen

2/15, KLOWN (2010)

2/17, The Fish’s Eye, Ian Frazier

2/20, “The Cripple of Inishmaan”, Martin McDonagh

2/23, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, Phillip K. Dick*

2/26, THE LONG GOODBYE* & PRIMER*

3/2, KNIVES INTO FORKS

3/3, A Governor’s Story, Jennifer Granholm and Dan Mulhern

3/6, Diary of a Superfluous Man, Ivan Turgenev

3/9, Endgame, Derrick Jensen

3/12, Good News, Edward Abbey

3/15, Earth House Hold, Gary Snyder

3/31, SPRING BREAKERS

4/9, The Long Loneliness, Dorothy Day

4/12, The Elegance of the Hedgehog, Muriel Barbery

4/20, Friends of Eddie Coyle, George V. Higgins

4/21, STAND CLEAR OF THE CLOSING DOORS

5/11, Going Down, David Markson

5/19, Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls, David Sedaris

5/26, Capital, John Lanchester

6/14, BEHIND THE CANDELABRA

6/15, Crow, Ted Hughes

6/15, SENNA*

7/26, The Shape of Content, Ben Shahn

8/10, Collected Stories, Richard Ford

8/14, I, Partridge, Alan Partridge

8/14, THE SHOUT

8/24, Fire in the Hole, Elmore Leonard

8/28, Pronto, Elmore Leonard

9/5, Riding the Rap, Elmore Leonard

9/7, UPSTREAM COLOR

9/9, DJANGO UNCHAINED

9/11, PACIFIC RIM

9/13, The Human Front, Ken Macleod

9/13, ELYSIUM

9/15, Consolations of the Forest, Sylvain Tesson

9/17, Changing the World is the Only Fit Work For a Grown Man, Steve Harrison

10/3, ANDROMEDA STRAIN*

10/6, La Place de la Concorde Suisse, John McPhee

10/31, ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST

11/2, ROOM 237

11/4, The Vagrants, Yiyun Li

12/2, Short Stories of Jack London: Authorized One-Volume Edition, Jack London

12/8, The Red Men, Matthew DeAbaitua

12/14, My Traitor’s Heart, Rian Malan

12/14 DOWNFALL

12/25, QUEEN OF VERSAILLES

12/26, HAPPY PEOPLE

12/28, DREDD

Written by Nick

January 2nd, 2014 at 10:52 am

PATRONYM teaser issue

Patronym

I’ve gotten a few questions about our holiday zine exchange and what I put together so I figured I’d post it here.

PATRONYM is a photonovella-style story about a rich industrialist’s last wishes in a post-famine world.

Anyway, enjoy it, complete with mock-inside-front-cover-ad, after clicking through.

Read PATRONYM

Written by Nick

December 28th, 2013 at 5:16 pm

The Contagious Holiday Zine Exchange!

contagious_zines

A while back I read a post somewhere, I think on the IDEO blog, about their experiment with a saddle stapler. There was a story about how they furnished an alcove at the back of the office, and put out the stapler, commonly used to make crude staple-bound zines, and lo, amazing rainbows of creativity happened.

We ain’t them, so I decided to steal part of this idea, with 100% more <shudder> forced creativity, and lo the Contagious Holiday Zine Exchange was born. Everybody had a few months to conceive and execute a zine, using the tools at their disposal, and we’d swap them at the end of the year.

Counting our own issues of Contagious, Most Contagious, and all the the client-commissioned stuff, we made probably 10+ print publications this year. But not everyone has the chance to get dirty with pagination, design, concept and all the other fun parts of making their own magazine. Hell, I’m an editor and I don’t feel like I always do.

I can’t tell you how impressed I was when we exchanged them today. Writers, sales folk, whoever, it didn’t matter. The publications were from the heart and fun, which is all you really need for a good zine.

Here’s a quick rundown:

Noelle: Drink More Whiskey, a primer on everyone’s favorite brown liquid, its characteristics and varieties, where to drink it, recipes, etc., with samples
Kyle: Pittie’ful Zine, a look at the pit bull terrier’s origins, evolution and characteristics, including info on pits in American history
Erin: les hashtags en francais, a study of this year’s top celebrity Twitter arrivals, with hashtagged critiques of their work in French
Arwa: Notes From Goats: A pun-filled literary magazine, as authored by goats (ie critique of The Great Goatsby)
Chris: A Hell of a Lot of Mice: Music and miscellany, including an article on Willis Earl Beal, photos from NYC venues and part of Chris’ top 52 albums of 2013 summary.

I did a short sci-fi photonovela called PATRONYM on the JP Morgan of the clone era coming to terms with his legacy.

Methods as far ranging as In Design and Comic Life and even old fashioned cut-and-paste and hand-lettering brought these to life.

Best of all, they really did what every good solo publication should do: convey something about the creator.

I was having lunch today with a guy who runs the innovation department at a really large package goods company, and one of the things he said stuck in my mind. “We have the tools,” he said, “we just don’t use them.” Sometimes you have to figure out a way to get people to use the tools.

Written by Nick

December 17th, 2013 at 9:48 pm

Things I Finished #1

In reverence to a tradition embraced by Jesse Schell and supported by Matt Webb, here’s the first of an ongoing series of posts titled ‘Things I Finished’, a kind of catch-all for media bits that took some effort and are worth mentioning.

Stories of Your Life: and Others, by Ted Chiang
I’d read a lot of Chiang’s stuff online, and finally picked this up to get through the last two I hadn’t seen, “Stories of Your Life” and “Understand”. Both didn’t disappoint. Chiang has a way of developing complete, convincing characters and worlds in a very compressed period of time, which makes it feel like he stretches the space of his stories. I’m excited to dig into his novella, The Lifecycle of Software Objects, as soon as the library delivers it to me.

Broker, Trader, Lawyer, Spy: The Secret World of Corporate Espionage, by Eamon Javers
I was hoping this would be a little less mass-market, which sounds kind of stuck-up, but there it is. Javers details how private security and detectives have turned into freelance spooks and ex-Federal agents working in shadowy Washington corridors on behalf of any and all interested customer, securing all sorts of valuable information at whatever price. Very interesting stuff, yes, and a difficult world to get access to, but I was hoping there’d be more nuts and bolts attached, that he’d get into those corridors to figure out how these guys do their jobs.1

True Grit
I’m way behind on Oscars viewing, but wanted to get this one out of the way while it was still in theaters. As always, the Coens know how to write dialogue, but I felt some of the thematic elements were a bit unformed, for instance the snake motifs.

  1. Meanwhile, back in Washington, the Anonymous/HBGary thing has stirred up a whole pot of shit, with the relationships Javers describes in the book exposed. We’ll see what Javers has to say–he seems to be stuck on Wall Street at the moment. []

Written by Nick

February 9th, 2011 at 11:38 pm